1867 - Bee Hive, Lambourne

The following report of an outing to the Bee Hive, Lambourne in 1867 appeared in a local newspaper:
 
ANNUAL DINNER OF MESSRS. HERBERT'S WORKMEN
 
The annual outing of the workmen in the employ of Messrs. Herbert and Sons, scale makers, &c., St. George's East, West Smithfield, and King's Cross, took place on Saturday. The party first met at West Smithfield, and started for King's Cross in a four-horse omnibus, where they were joined by Mr. Herbert, sen., and his friends in a waggonette, leaving at nine a.m. for the Bee Hive at Lambourne, Essex. The weather, which was very unpropitious, cleared up about 12, and an hour before dinner was spent in strolling about exploring. The company having sat down to an excellent and substantial dinner, Mr. Herbert, sen., occupying the chair, and Mr. Herbert, jun., facing him, proceeded to pay it that respect and attention which it demanded at their hands. At the conclusion of this interesting portion of the proceedings the usual loyal toasts were given and duly responded to. The toast of the day followed, "Success to the Firm of Messrs. Herbert and Son, accompanied by health and happiness to their families, was proposed by Mr. Stephens, and warmly drank with hearty cheers. Mr. Herbert, in returning thanks, very feelingly alluded to the absence of one who had favoured them regularly with his presence on these annual occasions for the last eleven years. He alluded to a representative of the Press, their late friend, Mr. Donovan, a gentleman he had known for 20 years, and who, he believed, was always very highly respected in the East of London. Mr. Donovan had a very large family, 13 children, to provide for, which had absorbed all his available means, and he had by his death left his widow and 10 children, the eldest of whom is only 15, entirely unprovided for. He (Mr. Herbert) thought this was a case he could fairly and honestly bring before them as worthy of sympathy, and he would take the liberty of asking those present to show their sympathy by joining him in contributing something towards the fund that was being raised in the East of London to provide, if possible, the means to enable the widow to support her family. Mr. Herbert's appeal was promptly responded to, the sum of £5 13s. 6d. being subscribed. Other toasts having been given, the rambles were resumed, after which all sat down to a capital tea. After a day most harmoniously spent, they returned to town, arriving about 11, all having thoroughly enjoyed their day's outing.

 
1867 - Bee Hive, Lambourne